underpricklystars asked: I LOVE your moon tattoo, and for my 18th I'm getting one like it but on the other side of my arm, I think. How come you decided to get it there? :)

Thank you xx

"Listen to them, children of the night, what music they make."

It’s my mark of Nosferatu, I’m Dracula’s little child of the night, his bride, thrall and muse.

I just read Aino Kallas’ Wolfbride like a week ago and the main character was a werewolf girl marked by the devil with a scar like a claw or a crescent and I was like omg cos I thought it was my great original idea with the meanings and all, but it could be some Carl Jung’s universal symbol thing or I had just heard about it a long time ago and it’s been brewing in my subconscious

I basically associate the tattoo with a lot of things, like odaxelagnia (biting fetish) strongly fixated around blood, endorphin high, sex, how Dracula’s brides are kind of mirror of The Three Graces aka charm, beauty and creativity all fucked up, the similarities between Drac and Peter Pan whom which I was obsessed with when I was little.

I could go on and on, but it’s such an unnecessary hassle to explain those associations and what they mean to me, like it’s really associative psycho therapy stuff. And to most people it’s just a moon.

pam-anderson:

Pamela in a “Baywatch” photoshoot, 1995, photographed by Kim Carlsberg

pam-anderson:

Pamela in a “Baywatch” photoshoot, 1995, photographed by Kim Carlsberg

psychojello:

Describing the different fashion themes and eras in Adam Ant’s career in one sentence

  • kabuki bondage
  • sexy pirate dandy highwayman very very sexy (i repeat he is very attractive)
  • too pretty 4 u
  • naughty nautical
  • fabio on the cover of a romance novel
  • leather daddy by way of the wild west
  • middle-aged
  • hey i did the pirate thing before johnny depp, ok
jbinjapan:

Flexipop Special (March, 1981)

jbinjapan:

Flexipop Special (March, 1981)

nitratediva:

"We queens are not free to answer the call of our heart…" Lil Dagover in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919).

nitratediva:

"We queens are not free to answer the call of our heart…" Lil Dagover in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1919).

but I kinda want this one more cos I feel the picture better

"My son is a homosexual, and I love him!"

I’m gonna have one of Rossetti’s Guggums tattooed near his name on my side and I think I changed my mind to the one below (idk why i keep doing this), but I need to figure out the placing, cos it’s a bit tricky hmhm


Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)
engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

Joan of Arc by Albert Lynch (1851-1912)

engraving from Figaro Illustre magazine, 1903

girlsandguns:

Chloë Sevigny, 1997

girlsandguns:

Chloë Sevigny, 1997

wonderland-to-westeros:

It is not precisely known when Elizabeth Siddal bridged the gap from muse to artist, nor is it known whether the desire to be an artist emerged during her time as a model or was a long-harboured dream brought to life by newfound circumstances. Whatever the case, we know that by 1853 Dante Gabriel Rossetti was teaching Lizzie to be an artist.

In 1854, John Ruskin- icon and patron of artists, including Pre-Raphaelite John Millais (definitely a story for another time)- began to show an interest in Rossetti’s work and, by default, in Lizzie’s. He liked her drawings so much that he offered her £150 per annum for all the works she produced, and masterminded the sales of several of her paintings. While Rossetti, her teacher, continued to struggle with his art, Lizzie flourished. Under funding and suggestion from Ruskin, she travelled to Oxford for her health and visited Paris. Lizzie as the artist began to outshine Rossetti, although it is impossible to tell whether he harboured any resentment. It appears that he supported her pursuits whole-heartedly, yet we also know that simultaneously he carried on affairs with Annie Miller and Fanny Cornforth. The dynamic between Lizzie and Rossetti at this time is enigmatic at best.

Few of Lizzie’s pictures survive, only those that were sold. After her death, Rossetti burned her drawings and letters because he could not bear to see them.

arthistorianmindswirls:

Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Elizabeth Siddal

arthistorianmindswirls:

Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Elizabeth Siddal

funeral-wreaths:

Three drawings by Elizabeth Siddal (1829-1862). Besides being a model for the Pre-Raphaelites, Siddal was also a talented poet and visual artist in her own right.

The Lady of Shalott at Her Loom, 1853
Lovers Listening to Music, 1854
Pippa Passes the Loose Women, 1854